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Events for February 2018

February 2, 2018
Music at the Museum
Rio
5:00 pm to 7:00 pm
Hear live Boss Nova jazz performed by Rio at the museum 5-7PM.
New Mexico Museum of Art
February 2, 2018
First Friday Art Chats
6:00 pm to 7:00 pm
Celebrating the 100 year history of the Museum, volunteer guides present 15 minute pop up talks prompting conversations about the architecture of the building and art in the collection.
New Mexico Museum of Art
February 3, 2018
Frank Buffalo Hyde
The Cultural Power of Native Art Series
1:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Join us as we celebrate the work of Frank Buffalo Hyde (Onondoga/Nez Perce) starting with the screening of the film Basquiat, followed by a talk Hyde in which is discusses the ways the artist influenced his own work.
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
February 4, 2018
Valentine’s Day Extravaganza
1:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Celebrate Valentine’s Day with art-making and poetry readings.  All ages welcome. Free. 1-4PM
New Mexico Museum of Art
February 4, 2018
Cara Romero
The Cultural Power of Native Art
2:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Join us as Cara Romero (Chemehuevi) discusses her photographic process and how her work has evolved through the years.
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
February 4, 2018
Making History Series
Making History
1:30 pm to 4:00 pm
Making History Light Up
New Mexico History Museum
February 7, 2018
Library Open House
Museum Issues
1:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Drop in to the library any time from 1-4PM to learn how museums work. The Museum’s Librarian/Archivist will be here to answer any questions and show you all the library has to offer. Free.
New Mexico Museum of Art
February 7, 2018
Friends of History Lecture Series
Christmas Revels: The 1919 New Mexico Mounted Police Raid on Santo Domingo Pueblo
Noon to 1:00 pm
Lecture by Joseph Sabatini, Retired Local History Librarian, Albuquerque Public Library  Free Auditorium event Seating is limited/bottled water only please
New Mexico History Museum
February 10, 2018
Counterculture Gallery Talk “The Art of the Poster” Dennis Larkins
CANCELLED EVENT
Noon to 1:00 pm

New Mexico History Museum
February 15, 2018
Picturing Zozobra
5:30 pm to 7:00 pm
FOCA+P members only. 5:30-7PM
New Mexico Museum of Art
February 18, 2018
Celebrate the Year of the Dog
Third Annual Lunar New Year
1:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Third annual community celebration of Lunar New Year with music, dance and refreshments. Admission to MoIFA is FREE for everyone courtesy of the Cotsen Family Foundation.
Museum of International Folk Art
February 18, 2018
Guided Tour of the Tunstall Murder Site
1:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Join the staff of Lincoln Historic Site for a special guided tour to the site of John Tunstall’s 1878 murder.
Lincoln Historic Site
February 18, 2018
GranMary’s Winter Storytelling Series
Featuring Emmett Garcia
2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Please join us on Sunday, February 18 at either 2pm or 3pm for storytelling with Emmett Garcia (Santa Ana / Jemez). Free with museum admission.
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
February 21, 2018
People to People
Art Maier
12:30 pm to 1:15 pm
Artist Ati Maier 12:30-1:15pm
New Mexico Museum of Art
February 21, 2018
"Let’s Take a Look"
MIAC Curators Examine Your Treasures
Noon to 2:00 pm
During this time, curators from The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture and The Laboratory of Anthropology are in the lobby of MIAC to look at your treasures. These curators will attempt to identify and explain any artifact or historic object presented to them. They prefer to work with objects from the Southwest but are willing to take a look at anything that is brought in. If they can not identify an object an attempt will be made to find someone who can. Sometimes, the discussion among the curators may become as much or more informative than the identification of the artifact. Curators cannot appraise any items but can refer you to resources that will. For more information, visit this page: http://indianartsandculture.org/lets-take-a-look  
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
February 23, 2018
Conversations with Collections
Documenting your collection
1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Free with admission. Limit 15 people. Email  rebecca.potance@state.nm.us  to reserve a spot.
New Mexico Museum of Art
February 24, 2018
Dropouts, Renegades, and Utopians: Irwin Klein’s photographs of the ’New Settlers’ of northern New Mexico
Author talk with Benjamin Klein
1:00 pm to 2:30 pm
Join us for a counterculture encore. Benjamin Klein shares the development of his project gathering and documenting the 80 known photographs by his late uncle Irwin Klein taken across northern New Mexico in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Pick up a copy of the University of Nebraska Press publication from our bookstore following the talk: “Irwin Klein and the New Settlers: Photographs of Counterculture in New Mexico.” Support provided by the New Mexico Humanities Council Free Auditorium event-Bottled water only please
New Mexico History Museum
February 24, 2018
The Bead Project with Cannupa Hanska Luger
Community Day to Contribute to Artist’s Installation
10:00 am to 5:00 pm
Join us on Saturday, February 24 for a day of making beads with Cannupa Hanska Luger. Drop in and make a few beads to represent a handful of indigenous individuals lost to violence. For the most complete information - including video - on Luger’s proejct, visit http://www.cannupahanska.com/mmiwqtbeadproject Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, Queer and Trans People BEAD PROJECT: 2” beads made from clay, unfired are requested from our communities to complete a monumental beaded portrait which will be created by artist Cannupa Hanska Luger from a photograph taken by First Nations photographer Kali Spitzer . This collaboration with community acknowledges our Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, Queer and Trans people. In Canada alone, the number of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women was at 4,000 in 2016 as noted in research gathered by the Native Women’s Association of Canada.  We are aware that the narrative of MMIWQT expands beyond a specific region, and by starting here, with acknowledging this number and this place for this specific portrait and creating collectively, we can move forward and continue to address MMIWQT in all of our respective homelands. This community engagement is meant to activate our processing of Missing and Murdered Indigenous People through the action of doing  and feeling in a collective effort to say ‘this is enough’. As you create, we ask you to hold awareness that each one of these beads represents an individual from our Indigenous communities that we have lost.
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
February 24, 2018
The ABCs: Archaeology, Beliefs, & Childhood
Archaeology 101 Series / with Paulina Przystupa
1:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Throughout history, more people have experienced childhood than survived into adulthood. In this lecture - delivered by Paulina Przystupa (UNM Graduate Student) - hear the ways in which we can learn about children as individuals and as members of prehistoric or historic communities using archaeology.
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
February 25, 2018
“Him Old Ruins” Edgar Lee Hewett and the History of Pueblo Painting
Lecture by Nancy Owen Lewis
1:00 pm to 2:30 pm
Tickets $10. Referred to "Him Old Ruins" by his Pueblo friends, Edgar Lee Hewett’s interest in their ceremonies helped spark the development of a new artistic genre.
New Mexico Museum of Art
February 25, 2018
Talk at the Museum by Christian Heinsen
Accomplished work in rural communities of Northern Chile in the Altiplano
3:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Cristian Heinsen, Executive Director of the Fundación Altiplano in Arica, Chile, will make a presentation on the work being accomplished to help rural communities of Northern Chile in the Altiplano. Free event-Bottled water only please  
New Mexico History Museum
February 27, 2018
Winter Lecture Series
Fray Angelico Chavez Vs. Willa Cather
6:00 pm to 7:00 pm
Come learn about the history of two great Southwestern writers, Fray Angelico Chavez and Willa Cather, in St. Francis Auditorium 6 - 7 pm. Free.
New Mexico Museum of Art


On Exhibit during February 2018

Through March 25, 2018
A Mexican Mirror
This exhibit features Mexican prints made by “the Peoples Graphic Workshop” from the collection of Senator Jeff and Anne Bingaman, along with other prints by contemporary artists working with the same commitment and passion for social justice. 
New Mexico History Museum
Through April 13, 2018
A Place Like No Other: Two Views of the New Mexico Landscape (Governor’s Gallery)
Exhibition of the work of Sheldon Parsons and Eliot Porter in the Governor’s Gallery on the 4th floor of the State Capitol.
New Mexico Museum of Art
Through April 29, 2018
Contact: Local to Global
Contact: Local to Global highlights the engagement of artists with New Mexico, the New Mexico Museum of Art with artists and collectors, and New Mexico’s engagement with the national and international arts community. Featuring the work of artists who have lived and worked in the region, works made in New Mexico and significant works with a connection to art in New Mexico, as well as artworks which address the broader issues of land, location and environment, the exhibition includes art by Bruce Nauman, Agnes Martin, Frederick Hammersley, Susan York, Postcommodity, Ati Maier and Yorgo Alexopoulos, among others.
New Mexico Museum of Art
Through April 30, 2018
EXTENDED! I-Witness Culture: Frank Buffalo Hyde
Artist Frank Buffalo Hyde (Onondaga/Nez Perce) believes it is the artist’s responsibility to represent the times in which they live. Transforming street art techniques into fine art practices, his humorous and acerbic narrative artworks do exactly that. In I-Witness Culture , Hyde investigates the space where Native Americans exist today: between the ancient and the new; between the accepted truth and the truth; between the known and the unknown. Hyde, who created fourteen paintings and three sculptures for I-Witness , divides his contemporary narrative into three sections: Paranormal: The Truth is Out Ther e; Selfie Skndns ; and In-Appropriate . Pre-millennium, if you asked anyone if Native Americans existed, they would tell you only in the past, in black and white photos. They are almost extinct, they would say, and their lands are gone. If you ever meet one, ask if you can touch their hair, take a picture of them as proof that you actually saw one—like Bigfoot they exist beyond the scope of normal experience. Post-millennium, Native Americans are part of the digital age, the selfie age, where if something hasn’t been posted to social media, it never happened. We are sharing information at a rate that has never been possible before in human history: We no longer just experience reality; we filter reality through our electronic devices. Today’s Native artists use technology as a tool of Indigenous activism, a means to document, and a form of validation. In a nation obsessed with sameness—afraid of difference—popular culture homogenizes indigenous cultures, "honoring" us with fashion lines, misogynistic music videos, or offensive mascots and Halloween costumes. Today, these stereotypes and romantic notions are irrelevant as a new generation of Native American artists uses social media to let the world know who they are. Today, we are the observers, as well as the observed. We are here, we are educated, and we define Indian art.      
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
Through July 16, 2018
Negotiate, Navigate, Innovate: Strategies Folk Artists Use in Today’s Global Marketplace
The  Mark Naylor and Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience is an experimental gallery inside the Museum of International Folk Art where the public is invited to help shape the content and form of the exhibition in real tme.
Museum of International Folk Art
Through July 29, 2018
Artistic Heritage: Syrian Folk Art
Folk Art is a treasure, and Lloyd’s Treasure Chest offers a participatory gallery experience highlighting the Museum’s permanent collection of over 136,000 objects of international folk art from over 100 countries, representing thousands of unique cultures. Because the entire collection can never be on view at the same time, collections are carefully stored and cared for in rooms such as our Neutrogena Vault, which visitors can view from the Treasure Chest gallery.
Museum of International Folk Art
Through September 3, 2018
Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West
Footwear is evocative. It tells us about belonging, love, and social aspiration, reflecting the lives of makers and wearers and offering a window into the past and the present. This exhibition features sandals that date back thousands of years found in the dry caves of New Mexico and nearby regions; includes Plains and Southwest moccasins, many beautifully beaded or quilled, and exhibited for the first time in decades; and concludes with examples of contemporary high fashion footwear made artists like Teri Greeves, Lisa Telford, and Emil Her Many Horses. Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West opens at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture on August 27, 2017, and will be on display until September 3, 2018.
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
Through September 16, 2018
No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art
Tramp art is the product of industry, a style of woodworking from the late 19th and early 20th centuries that made use of discarded cigar boxes and fruit crates that were notched and layered to make a variety of domestic objects.
Museum of International Folk Art
Through October 1, 2018
Points Through Time
Projectile points are one of the most iconic images of archaeology in the American Southwest. This exhibition focuses on some of the projectile points that are commonly found here in New Mexico from Paleoindian times (13,500 years ago), through the Archaic, and into Puebloan times (1,260 to 110 years ago) as well as some of the exotic points that have come to New Mexico from California and Texas. The exhibit discusses how archaeologists classify points, why they change through time, and how illegal collection of points can impact the archaeological record. This exhibit opens on International Archaeology Day on Saturday October 21, 2017 at the Center for New Mexico Archaeology (7 Old Cochiti Road). After that, the exhibit is open to the public Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on holidays. Please drop by Archaeology Day at the CNMA! For more info on the event, click the "Upcoming Events" tab to your right.
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
Through October 7, 2018
Shifting Light : Photographic Perspectives
Shifting Light offers a twenty-first century perspective on the museum’s long-term engagement with the popular medium of photography. Using portraits and oral histories, the show introduces some of the personalities in New Mexico’s twentieth-century photography scene, including Laura Gilpin, Ansel Adams, Thomas Barrow, Anne Noggle and Joyce Neimanas, among many.
New Mexico Museum of Art
Through November 25, 2018
Horizons: People & Place in New Mexican Art
Drawn primarily from the New Mexico Museum of Art’s extensive collection, Horizons shows the wide and dynamic range of styles, personalities, cultures, and forms that visual creative expression took here in the 20th century. Featured artists include Robert Henri, Marsden Hartley, John Sloan, Georgia O’Keeffe, Bert Greer Phillips, James Stovall Morris, Victor Higgins, Awa Tsireh, Maria Martinez, Fritz Scholder, Alfred Morang, Cady Wells, Andrew Dasburg, and Gustave Baumann, among many others.
New Mexico Museum of Art
Through March 10, 2019
Crafting Memory: The Art of Community in Peru
This exhibition explores the new directions taken by current Peruvian folk artists during the recent decades of social and political upheaval and economic change. The exhibition will highlight the biographies and social histories of contemporary artists along with examples of work that preserve family tradition, reimagine older artforms, reclaim pre-Columbian techniques and styles, and forge new directions for arte popular in the 21st century.
Museum of International Folk Art
Through July 7, 2019
Lifeways of the Southern Athabaskans
The Museum of Indian Arts and Culture will exhibit over 100 objects dating from the late 1880s to the present. Cultural objects will represent the lifeways of the different Apachean groups in New Mexico and Arizona. These cultural objects include basketry, beaded clothing, hunting and horse gear. These groups are: Jicarilla Apache, Mescalero Apache, Fort Sill Apache (Chiricahua), San Carlos Apache and White Mountain Apache.
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
on long-term display
The Buchsbaum Gallery of Southwestern Pottery
The Buchsbaum Gallery features each of the Pueblos of New Mexico and Arizona in a selection of pieces that represent the development of a community tradition. In addition, a changing area of the gallery, entitled Traditions Today highlights the evolving contemporary traditions of the ancient art of pottery making.
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
on long-term display
Here, Now and Always
Here, Now, and Always is a major exhibition based on eight years of collaboration among Native American elders, artists, scholars, teachers, writers and museum professionals. Voices of fifty Native Americans guide visitors through the Southwest’s indigenous communities and their challenging landscapes. More than 1,300 artifacts from the Museum’s collections are displayed accompanied by poetry, story, song and scholarly discussion.
Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
on long-term display
Segesser Hide Paintings
Though the source of the Segesser Hide Paintings is obscure, their significance cannot be clearer: the hides are rare examples of the earliest known depictions of colonial life in the United States. Moreover, the tanned and smoothed hides carry the very faces of men whose descendants live in New Mexico today...
New Mexico History Museum
on long-term display
Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time
Now 400 years old, Santa Fe was once an infant city on the remote frontier.  Santa Fe Found: Fragments of Time, on long-term exhibit in the Palace of the Governors, explores the archaeological evidence and historical documentation of the City Different before the Spanish arrived, as well as at the settling of the first colony in San Gabriel del Yungue, the founding of Santa Fe and its first 100 years as New Mexico’s first capital. Co-curated by Josef Diaz of the New Mexico History Museum/Palace of the Governors and Stephen Post of the DCA/Office of Archaeological Studies, Santa Fe Found collects more than 160 artifacts from four historic sites, along with maps, documents, household goods, weaponry and religious objects. Together, they tell the story of cultural encounters between early colonists and the Native Americans who had long called this place home.
New Mexico History Museum
on long-term display
Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now
Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now , the main exhibition of the New Mexico History Museum, sweeps across more than 500 years of stories - from early Native inhabitants to today’s residents - told through artifacts, films, photographs, computer interactives, oral histories and more. Together, they breath life into the people who made the American West: Native Americans, Spanish colonists, Mexican traders, Santa Fe Trail riders, fur trappers, outlaws, railroad men, scientists, hippies and artists.  
New Mexico History Museum
on long-term display
Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción
Treasures of Devotion/Tesoros de Devoción contains bultos, retablos, and crucifijos dating from the late 1700s to 1900 which illustrate the distinctive tradition of santo making in New Mexico introduced by settlers from Mexico.
New Mexico History Museum
on long-term display
Multiple Visions: A Common Bond
Multiple Visions: A Common Bond has been the destination for well over a million first-time and repeat visitors to the Museum of International Folk Art. First, second, third, or countless times around, we find our gaze drawn by different objects, different scenes. With more than 10,000 objects to see, this exhibition continues to enchant museum visitors, staff and patrons.
Museum of International Folk Art
on long-term display
Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy
Will Rogers noted that Fred Harvey “kept the West in food—and wives.” But the company’s Harvey Girls are by no means its only legacy. From the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’s 1879 arrival in New Mexico to the 1970 demolition of Albuquerque’s Alvarado Hotel, the Fred Harvey name and its company’s influence have been felt across New Mexico, not to mention the American West. The company and its New Mexico establishments served as the stage on which people such as Mary Colter were able to fashion an “authentic” tourist experience, along with Herman Schweizer who helped drive the direction of Native American jewelry and crafts as an industry. Setting the Standard: The Fred Harvey Company and Its Legacy , a new section that joins the New Mexico History Museum’s main exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from Then and Now, helps tell those stories. Opening December 7, Setting the Standard uses artifacts from the museum’s collection, images from the Palace of the Governors Photo Archives and loans from other museums and private collectors. Focusing on the rise of the Fred Harvey Company as a family business and events that transpired specifically in the Land of Enchantment, the tale will leave visitors with an understanding of how the Harvey experience resonates in our Southwest today.
New Mexico History Museum


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